Richard Hooker on Justification and Predestination

David Neelands summarizes Richard Hooker’s views of predestination:

“God wills that all be saved, and offers undeserved grace to all; according to the will of God, Christ died for all. God gives grace sufficient for salvation to all, even to the obdurate, and all may resist that grace. God deals graciously, and providentially, with all and forces none. Yet not all are elect, and those who are elect are absolutely dependent on God’s grace for their salvation. The elect, though they may temporarily and totally lapse, will finally be saved. Temporary justification and obedience may be found in those who are not elect. Those not elect deserve the punishment for the vices and personal impediments they put up to God’s grace offered; God is not the cause of their ultimate damnation. Finally, the elect must not presume on election, but live in hope. They are required to attend to the universal external vocation of God and the Christian gospel, and to use the means God offers, including the sacraments in which inward grace is offered. This universal external vocation includes exhortation to virtue, which, through the grace of God, the elect achieve, and for which they are rewarded, though they are not capable of such virtue on their own.”

W. David Neelands, “Hooker and Predestination” in A Companion to Richard Hooker (Leiden: Brill, 2008), 219. (HT: Barlow)

From this above quote it’s clear that Richard Hooker believed in temporary justification. I wonder what R. Scott Clark would say about this. Is Hooker now deserving of ecclesiastical discipline, outside a confessional Reformed interpretation of the Bible and a pastoral danger? Really Scott? Are Hooker and the 39 Articles not Reformed?